Joe Bob's Advice to the Hopeless - Dec '14

WRITING - Advice to the Hopeless

Dear Joe Bob, Thank you with all my heart.

I recently obtained an old copy of Joe Bob Goes to the Drive In and watched my niece go to tears laughing at your totally professional and fair imitation of someone who was not the anti-war, pro-art man you are. You were my once-a-week relief in the 80's when I was washing dishes in Austin and we would rush to buy out the Dallas newspaper (and there was only ONE Dallas newspaper then) to read your column aloud while we slaved in the kitchen heat. Thank you. Your writing in the 80's was air conditioning to us in that slave hall. BTW, some guy in LA found a copy of Hells Angels Forever on tape and digitalized it. I bought it two weeks ago after searching 25 years on the alleged Internet.....and I thought I had hallucinated the movie 'cause no mention. Watched it several times over, compared your review in JBGTTM and have to concede....you were unduly unfair to these obvious humanitarians.

You should be ashamed!

Paul


Hey Paul--

Thanks for the great memories. One of which is the Hell's Angels sending an "enforcer" to mess me up when I was late for the introduction of "Hell's Angels Forever" at the Inwood Theater in Dallas.

Preciate the nice words! Hang in there, Joe Bob




Hey Joe Bob! I'm a big fan of yours! Were you in the movie "The Trial of Lee Harvey Oswald"? In the TV movie The Trial of Lee Harvey Oswald at around 1:56 the actor playing the guy who carpooled with Lee Harvey Oswald and saw Lee with the brown package of "curtain rods"is that you ? It sounds just like you but doesn't look much like you? Matt

Matt, You're talking about the two-night miniseries from 1977, but you may not know there was a movie with the same title, made in Dallas in 1964 by the late great Larry Buchanan. At any rate, I wasn't in either of them. I was in Dallas in 1977 but I was a feature reporter for the Dallas Times-Herald and had no idea I would ever try acting. Preciate the nice words, bud. Hang in there, Joe Bob

Hi Joe Bob, In your commentary on "Incredibly Strange Creatures...!!?, you wanted to know what Madam Estrella and Ortega were doing with their hands (in a scene following the stabbing of the Barker and Stella). They were mixing acid with glass beakers. I realize someone has probably answered this question before but just in case they have not, I thought I would put in my two cents. Your fan, James Clay James-- At last I can sleep at night! Thanks a lot, bud.


That's a while back that I did that commentary. Preciate the support.

Hang in there, Joe Bob





Joe Bob, I have heard that there may be a remake of the classic movie:"curse of the demon." Have you heard anything about this? If so, please send me an e mail with full details. One of my comments appeared in one of your columns years ago in the d.t.h. Robert

Robert--

I'm not a fan of remakes but I can see why whoever has the rights is choosing that one in 2014. Paranormal is crazy popular right now. I'll check into it and let you know. Preciate the support, bud.

Hang in there, Joe Bob

 

 

Dear Joe Bob, I recall reading in one of your articles a while ago that the imposition of Daylight Savings Time was an effort by the studios and big movie theaters to cripple the Drive-Ins. I also saw the documentary on PBS which asserted the same thing. Sounds good to me. The problem is, that some of the skeptics here demand that I back up my opinions with facts, and I cannot find any reference to the relationship between DST and the death of the Drive-Ins. When you get a minute, could you help me out here by pointing me to a source of information regarding how The Man went after the Drive-In by changing the time every Spring?

George


Dear George,

Daylight Savings Time was instituted in the United States toward the end of the drive-in's heyday, namely, 1967, with the result that a lot of triple-feature venues had to become double features, and some drive-ins had June and July start times of 9 p.m. or later. Obviously this was not good for business, and the owners started holding barbecues and instituting other attractions like miniature golf to get families to come earlier. Then in 1973 the feds ordered mandatory year-round DST, so the southern drive-ins that had shows in the winter had to deal with it 365 days a year. Fortunately that only lasted a year. By then most drive-ins had turned to porn just to survive.

There were a lot of contributing factors--the rise of the multiplex, the decline of Detroit gas guzzlers and the rise of Japanese rice rockets, and, yes, DST was one of them--but the drive-ins that managed to last to the mid-eighties are mostly still in business today.

Preciate the support, bud. Hang in there, Joe Bob